Losing Faith…. pt. four.

The new Star Wars Prequels are not terrible. The movies don’t deserve hatred or fan outrage. Yet, I do wish they had been slightly different. Being a child in the late 70s and early 80s, I was the perfect age to enjoy the Original Trilogy. I also had 15 years of adult years, college study and personal imagination to overthink the next chapter.

The Force in the Prequels was simply forgotten. When it came time to explain important things, expand on the mythology, we simply didn’t get them. Almost like George couldn’t answer them himself (odd since this was his world – his creation). Or maybe he just didn’t want to revel his hand. Now, I’m not stating I needed more such as how or why it worked (so I definitely don’t want Midichlorians). Actually keeping it vague actually works for the story. But, why does Obi-Wan and Yoda disappear to the Force in the Original Trilogy but no one in the Prequel Trilogy does? This was a critical misfire for the saga. Yes, at the end of Revenge of the Sith, we get one line of dialog to “wrap” that mystery. But why wasn’t this slowly developed through the entire Prequel Trilogy. Why wasn’t the audience shown the Jedi more in tune with the Force? (not just using its magical powers) With Anakin, Qui-Gon should have just felt the Force stronger than he’d ever felt it before within Anakin. Instead of testing his blood, he should have told Obi-wan “There’s something about this boy! I’ve never felt a vergence of the Force like I have with him.” “Even around Master Yoda?” “Not even Master Yoda!” Their surprise is the cinematic story telling. Concluding in a test similar to the one Anakin got in front of the council, we, as an audience, know that Anakin is Force sensitive. He would and did perform tasks that are beyond that of an average Padawan. But still raw! (not the Rey syndrome!) Qui-gon’s original Force insight of Anakin would make sense with what we know from the OT: “I feel a presence I’ve not felt in a long time.” “It was a 1000 voices all screamed out in terror at once.” “Search your feelings.” “Leia is my sister.” – “Your insight serves you well!”.

Queen Amidala of the Naboo should have been a true royal monarch. There’s nothing wrong for a royal Queen ruling a world or people in a fantasy story. Actually, it would have made more sense. It would have been a positive look at a monarchy style government. Besides, the government of the galaxy is a democratic Galactic Republic with representatives of each member planet working together for a greater good. Well until, it became corrupt and open for an evil Emperor to take over. More important it would have stay true to George’s original story element of Anakin marrying a young queen. With some slight tweaking, Amidala would still get mixed up in the action as a Padme decoy. I always thought it would have been more powerful to see how Naboo suffered once the Empire formed and Amidala had to go into hiding. (maybe I’ll go into more details at some point). Secondly, Amidala wouldn’t die at the end of Revenge of the Sith. Naboo would fall to Imperial control. The Royal family would be imprisoned or forced into hiding. That scene in ROTS, where Yoda and Obi-wan decide to go into hiding, it should have included Amidala. Yoda asks, “what should we do with children. They are a threat to Anakin?” Bail Organa volunteers, “We will adopt the girl (smiles at Amidala), we’ve always wanted to adopt a girl. Your majesty, you will serve as her Nanny on Alderaan and you’ll be safe there.” Yoda questions, “what about the boy?” Obi-wan offers, “to his family on Tatooine. I will go and watch over him.” This also doesn’t deviate the facts we already know. Leia would have memories of her real mother because she was her nanny. Young Padme would still die young but thats a story for another time.

Easy fixes and the story wasn’t drastically changed. It doesn’t impact the sadness at the end of ROTS nor does it cause issues in wrapping up the Prequel Trilogy….

to be concluded….

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