What Happened to Journalism? ….

So, the internet destroyed honest journalism. Wait. Hear me out. I believe it. Listen.

The other day I was looking over the social media sites and came across and article about …. comic book industry and some words of wisdom from a very well known comic book creator. As I continue to read the article, I realize that the person writing the article is just retelling what the creator said at a recent show. And this got me to thinking about many many articles I see everyday on the internet.

Y’know, those articles where the breaking story is someone has an opinion about something and then this website tries to spin it as earth-shattering news. I’ll try to better detail it. With the invention of Twitter and social media, the thoughts and activities of the celebrity crowd is no long a mystery to anyone. (Maybe it should be?) That’s my belief no one watches the Oscars or any other award show anymore. Why tune in to see your favorite star when you get pics of their food, what they did in the Bahamas, and 140 character snippets of their morals and virtu signaling. It’s true!

Nowadays, these quasi-news sites exaggerate everything in the name of clicks. That’s how they make money. Just go to one of the sites and the madness of pop-up ads and banners all over the site. Heck, I can’t read a 10 paragraph article without scrolling past 10 banner ads for TV shows and miracle cures for my Diabetes. Thus, let’s say “fake news” is a real thing. (Yet thats a whole different topic). Sorry, back to the someone saying stuff about something. Example: Kevin Smith tells all about the MCU/Sony Split. So I click. $$ for them. I start to read. The “journalist” writing the piece begins to draw me in. Banner ad $$ for them. I continue to read. More banners $$$ for them. Oh, so the entire article is based around the 10 tweets you copied and pasted from Twitter? Really! You have to be F**king Me! Seriously!? Does anyone remember when a reporter had to pick up the phone, call a source, run to the studio and stalk the actor to get a quote? (If you don’t, I truly feel sorry for you). I do. That was reporting. That’s when I started to wonder. I wondered if this snowflake writer would be able to get this “breaking news” if he/she had to actually do some work? I really don’t think so.

If any news site wants to earn credibility or be a trusted news source (again), then actually do research. Maybe call the celebrity and interview them about the tweets not just repost them with your “divine” insight. And I’d think real journalists would get angry by this. It really doesn’t help the industry.

Oh well, thats todays thought….

Some simple bullet points….

Here are some simple bullet points that could save the Comic Book Industry. First off, I’ve been a reader, a consumer, a business owner, a manager of a company and lived life. These are based on common sense, not political correctness nor social pandering….

  1. Cover price must drop. $1 sounds right.
  2. Reprint issues from the past. Like all the time.
  3. Return to newsprint (or similar) paper.
  4. Advertise the comic book! I’ve seen a dozens of comic book movies in 10 years, NOT one time did I see some kind of promotion or tagline to go buy the comics these stories were based on. Poor marketing!
  5. Get comics at every check stand in America. Again, this should be a $1, reprint or even first run.
  6. Advertise. Plan and simple. Where does DC or Marvel advertise besides their own comic books. I remember as a kid seeing television commercials to pick up G.I. Joe, X-men and Superman comics “where magazines were sold!”
  7. Stop hiring comic writers simply because they fit a demographic.
  8. Overhaul the compensation of comic creators, writers and artists, so they want to create the best comics possible. This starts with lower salaries and more royalties. If I’m making $75K write a book and you hired me just cause of my skin color, why do I care if the book sells or is popular. Lower the going rate and offer more sales incentives. Allow creators to feel some ownership of the characters they are writing even if its owned by a mega-corporation.
  9. Run it as a business not as cultural propaganda. Tell good stories and everyone, all diversities will buy it.
  10. Listen to your consumers, the customer, your readers, your fans, your audience. Even 1 bad review is 1 too many. Ask yourself, why are readers angry. Don’t blame them for the poor quality of the product.

Simple stuff. And that’s probably not all of it. Comic books should LIVE!