Last minute …. greatness!

For as long as I can remember. I have been a procrastinator. I always say I’ll get an early start and if you work slowly there will be plenty of time to complete the project.

Sounds good on paper. Yet, I don’t think I’ve ever done that.

Then, suddenly, the deadline approaches. What seemed like an eternity just a few days ago, is now being questioned if it’s enough time at all. The rush is on. Every hour is now focused.

And so here I sit. Same ol’ same ol’. The script is due by the 15th. The project started sometime in November. Technically, I should finish a couple days earlier so it can be reviewed and one last edit. Is it a problem that about 40 pages shy of the needed amount? Wait, thats about 10 pages a day, right? I can do that.

As I said, this is typical for me — school papers, miniature painting competitions. Those stressful last minute pushes to get things done have worked well. I’ve always gotten good scores or awards. So perhaps I work best under pressure and in those last minute rushes, I succeed with greatness. Well, cross your fingers and wish me luck….

Everything is Super!

Growing up in a small town in southeast New Mexico, I knew only a simple life. There wasn’t much there.

I’m not sure how we heard about anything. As a child, I’m not sure how we knew what was cool or hip. Logically, we weren’t living in a Amish community. We had radio and television. We had a few big stores like SEARS and JCPenney. So perhaps this kept our little community in touch to the outside world. If we saw it on TV, we trusted the SEARS would bring it to us. This is where I showed my mother the Atari 2600 and the VCR.

Roswell was too small to have a Toys R Us. Nearly every toy I every owned was purchased from Kmart. I hold a sentimental hold on Kmart. This is where I saw my first Star Wars figure. This is where I saw Voltron toys for the first time. As I got older, this was where I bought my first phone and Walkman.

Kmart was the Walmart of my childhood. We did eventually get a Walmart when we got a real shopping mall. This was around 1984. Then sometime in 1989 we got a Target. Yet I always thought that I needed to leave the small town and live in a real city. So when given the opportunity I left for the big city of Denver. We got a hotel and right next door was a Super Kmart. I was amazed. I figured this city has the places we have but here they were super! Everything is Super! I knew my life going forward would be better!

I learned later that Super Kmart was the first in Colorado but it didn’t tarnish my new excitement and astonishment of my new home. It’s hard to believe this marks my 25th year living in this Super city. But you wanna know a secret….I now have dreams of returning to a small town — where it’s a bit quieter and where everyone isn’t moving so fast.

I think that would be Super….

Toys are for Kids!

As I write this, I am inspired to do the research but right now I’m just going to write my thoughts.

I wonder if children buy toys anymore? Specifically I’m curious if children buy Hot Wheels, Star Wars figures, or any of the Marvel Legends or DC Multiverse action figures. These are toy lines that have huge adult collector bases. And if they do, what is the percentage of those purchases vs. the adult collector.

I don’t collect any more yet old habits die hard (that’s right Mr. McClane!). When I enter a Target or Wal-mart, the first area I hit is the toy aisles. I don’t go there to buy but to peruse. I’m still intrigued and interested by toys. Both boy and girls focus. In some alternate timeline I became a toy designer. I think I would have been good at that. So, when I’m in the aisle I very rarely see children. It’s not during school hours. Usually on the weekend or evenings. I can’t recall the last time I saw a kid going through the Hot Wheels. But I do see adult men all the time.

Then I start wondering if Mattel just makes Hot Wheels for old guys. As if they gave up long ago that kids want to play with little metal cars on winding plastic tracks. The same thought process goes for Barbie. Over the holidays I saw the Christmas Barbie — just sitting on the shelves. I remember when grown women would fight (literally as in push and shove) for these dolls in the 1990s. These dolls were designed for the adult collector because they had a price point of $29.99 and up. The ones this year were marked $39.99 and no one was buying. And I’m sure parents wouldn’t spend that on a child — in any decade.

Toys are for kids so I hope they are still buying them!