…push us further!

Honesty.

Be honest to yourself.

Be honest to those around you.

It’s easier to show a side of honesty than trying to deceive or misdirect.

I’ve always believed I’d rather tell the truth than be shamed by being dishonest. Perhaps I had a great teacher – my mother.

It’s a virtue I hold higher than most. Yet I still have a filter and don’t always share my true feelings. I wish I did not do that. Maybe it would be liberating. Yet I try to be non confrontational and wish to be liked by all.

As I grow older, I’ve discovered cynicism and pessimism. I wish I hadn’t.

But I think if we were more honest with each other maybe we wouldn’t get so easily offended by insignificant things. Because the honesty would developed a tougher skin. It can make us stronger and push us further.

Just be honest…

That and that and that!

Going back isn’t an option. It took me years to stop worrying about what I didn’t accomplish. The worrying had turned to regret. I regretted not going down certain roads — turning right when maybe I should have turned left. I knew that I shouldn’t regret where I was. I was on this path because that is where my destiny took me. The regret may have caused anxiety of missed opportunities; the path dreamed of a better life.

Things may have not gone to plan but I’m still moving forward. I’ve learned so much. I’m stuck my foot in my mouth several times. There was a time where I would have told someone, I will always collect Star Wars toys. Well, I’ve not collected a Star Wars toy in a decade. (Golly! Has it been over ten years since the end of the Prequal Trilogy?) Then there was a time that I would have told someone, that I will forever keep my collectibles. I’ve sold most of them and I’m continuing you sell and purge the things I don’t need. (I’m really moving toward a life of simple and minimalism.)

As I child, I had a hand in so many geek things: playing D&D, collecting Star Wars and Star Trek, building plastic model kits of naval ships and World War II airplanes, and reading / hoarding comic books. Some of these hobbies have come and gone. As I head into the second half of my life, I’ve found that some of those hobbies have returned. At first, I criticized myself for not being more true to those past hobbies. Figuring that if I had been building model kits for the past 20 years, I’d be much better at it. Then, I realized that actually I have something I would have lost—the ability to enjoy the discovery. So, I’ve returned to building plastic model kits. Instead of stating, “I’ve built that and that and that. what’s left to do?” I can say, “I can’t wait to build that and that and that!”

Life takes us where we are meant to be. We don’t get a rewind button. Nor should we have one. Know that your core will always be true but the small details can and will change over time. Embrace it!